Oromo types from Abyssinia.
Photos from The Making of Egypt, W.M. Flinders Petrie, 1939, page 132.

Petrie Museum of Egyption Archaeology.
Oromo in Ancient Egypt
7th, 10th and 12th  Dynasty
Oromo [Gala]

Map from The Making of Egypt, W.M. Flinders Petrie, 1939, page 132.
The people call themselves Oromo, and prefer to be called so. In some literature you may find Galla.
See family tree of the 12th dynasty
Land of Punt
W.M. Flinders Petrie, A History of Egypt - Part One, 1896, pp. 125-129

"The Oromo Penetration. It has long ago been remarked that the black sphinxes, later appropriated by the Hyksos, approximated to the Oromo type of Abyssinia".

"This starts an enquiry how the Oromo connection could thus appear on monuments. In the clearance and planning of the rock tombs at Qau, Antaeopolis, the peculiar plan of those tombs, with great halls and small chambers annexed, was observed to be closely parallel to that of later Nubian temples. In both tomb and temple the chief work is in the solid rock, while the forecourt is of masonry constructed in front of it. Another peculiarity was the hammer-work excavation of one tomb, which had evidently been done with stone balls, as in the Aswan granite working, and this implies a southern connection".

"These people do not appear in any records, and all their monuments have been reappropriated. They left, however, a most striking style of sculpture, in the sphinxes which were later removed to Tanis, but seem originally to have come from El Kab, where a piece of such a sphinx has been found. The type is closely like that of the Oromo. The evidence that all the earlier sculptures of Tanis were collected there by Ramessu II seems clear; and that these sphinxes are earlier than the Hyksos is certain by those kings having appropriated them. No period seems so likely for them as the 7th to the 10th dynasties. The type was heavily bearded, with bushy hair".

"Thus again a southern people reanimated Egypt, like the Sudani 3rd dynasty and the Oromo 12th dynasty".

"All of the perennial enemies of Egypt had poured into the land, from the north-east, the south, and the west, just as in the 7th B.C. the Assyrian and Scythian, the Ethiopian, and the Libyan of Sais struggled over the helpless Egyptians. The history of Egypt from the earliest age has always been the same; each great age has been the product of an able race of invaders."--Petrie
Cairine lady waited upon by a Oromo servant girl.
Prisse D'Avennes, 1807-1879, artist

Printed on image: Drawn by E. Prisse.
On stone by Mouilleron.
Printed on verso: Exhibition--Arabs.

Plate from the book: The Valley of the Nile, James Madden, London, 1851.
Habesh, or, Abysinnian servant, Cairo.
Prisse D'Avennes, 1807-1879, artist

Printed on image: "On stone by Mouilleron."
Printed by Le[m]ercier, Paris.
Printed on verso: "Exhibits--Egypt: Modern: set."

Plate from the book: The Valley of the Nile, James Madden, London, 1851.
Original: color lithograph.
Description: 1851 Hand Colored Stone Lithograph: Characters, Costumes, and Modes of Life, in the Valley of the Nile. James Madden, London, 1851 Illustrated from the designs taken on the spot, by Emile Prisse. Prisse worked in Egypt, documenting the land and its inhabitants. He provided institutions with a very rich documentation of pre-modern Egypt. He was also one of the first people to realize the importance of the preservation and protection of ancient artifacts and monuments Prisse's original drawings were redrawn onto stone and published by James Madden.
1851 Hand Colored Stone Lithograph: Characters, Costumes, and Modes of Life, in the Valley of the Nile
Abyssinian

Written on border: "1885"

Source Title: Egypt: descriptive, historical and picturesque.
Creator: Ebers, Georg; 1837-1898
Publisher: London: Cassell, 1881-1882.

Picture from The New York Public Library
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